Posts tagged dogs

Hear Me

Today our customers lost a dear old dog. She was in congestive heart failure and quite old. She was rushed in to the vet’s place this morning for treatment.
The Dr. suggested that they go ahead and put her down, but Mrs. ‘Smith’ wanted blood work and anything else they could do. The vet was understandably upset, after all, they don’t want any animal needlessly suffering. Unfortunately it seemed to me that neither party was listening to the other.
The vet had the dog on oxygen so she could breathe more easily, and was upset over the dog’s suffering. Mrs. Smith however was sure that her little dog would rally and could go home with her today.
The doctor seemed surprised when I said that Mrs. Smith just wanted a miracle for her dog. She wasn’t being heartless over her dog’s sufferings. She just wasn’t ready to let go,but when are any of us? I felt that neither client nor doctor was hearing the other. The client didn’t want to hear that there was no hope. The vet heard only “I don’t want her put down.”
I feel that though we listen to each other, we don’t often enough , hear each other. Something to work on, yes?

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Spring!

Spring is here and peoples thoughts are turning to their garden. For those of you with pets, some thought needs to go into what plants you choose and what types of mulch you use.

Lilies are beautiful! And deadly to cats and dogs. there are a great many toxic plants out there I’ve discovered. You can find a complete list a various online sites. I use the ASPCA site. They also have an iphone and ipod touch app. Very handy when you are out shopping.

Cocoa mulch has become very popular with some gardeners. It smells very nice, and looks great. Unfortunately our dogs think it smells very nice too. It can have the same effects on them as chocolate. I was very surprised the manufacturers didn’t put a warning on the bags the 1st time I saw it in a garden shop.
I have read that the attractive smell dissipates in short order, but some dogs would still eat it I’m sure.
Anytime you are not sure about a plant or product, do some research before you buy.

Insecticides and baits are also dangerous to our pets. Please read carefully before you apply. The same goes for fertilizers. Although some fertilizers are labeled child and pet safe after they have been watered in.

All in all, spring is a wonderful time to enjoy your garden with your pets. Let’s just be careful out there,OK?

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Choosing a Kennel to Board Your Pet

How do you choose a kennel for your pet? It’s important to be sure that your pet will be well cared for while you’re away, so you won’t feel guilty or stressed about leaving him there. So let’s run down the list of some things to look for.

1. Is the kennel clean and well cared for? Odors and disrepair should set off alarms. It shows a lack of pride in the establishment and lack of care for the animals. Make sure you tour the accommodations. If they don’t want you to see the kennels, Don’t leave your pet with them.

2. Are the kennels roomy enough for the pet’s bedding and food and water? Is the lighting good? Are there views to the outside? It’s very stressful to be shut up all day and night with nothing but the walls to see.We should be past the age of old-fashioned cramped kenneling. Especially if your pet is making a stay of any duration.

3. Do they require proof of vaccinations? Most places now require Bordatella boosters not more than 10 days prior to bording.

4.Make sure they don’t overbook, so that all pets get a good amount of attention. Also overcrowding leads to more stress and noise.

5. How often are they walking the boarders? How long does your pet have to go between walks. Bare minimum is twice a day. Three times a day is better, and four times would be really nice. How much time does your pet get outside of the kennel on their walks each day? They need more than a quick potty break. Find out how many people are staffing the kennels. Just one person can’t possibly give enough attention to every boarder.

6. get recommendations from everyone you can. Your groomer is sincerely attached to their charges and will steer you in the right direction. Friends with pets, and your vet should also be checked with.

7. When you pick up your pet, how does he behave? Of course he’s going to be happy to see you. Does he seem upset or depressed? Fearful, shy? Try to read their body language and make further inquiries if needed.

8. If you can’t find a kennel you trust, there are always pet sitters/house sitters. Ask around and you’ll find something both you and your pet will be happy with.

9. a final note. A lot a vet techs also house sit and would be a good choice if your pet is on medication, as they will watch for any adverse symptoms or medical problems.

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